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Welcome to the EXECUTIVE Game Demo

THE EXECUTIVE GAME *) is a business simulation game for teaching planning and decision making for executives. It is well suited to motivate team work and discussion of management decisions as well as the the usage of planning tools like spreadsheets.

The game was originally developed at UCLA by R.C. Henshaw and J.R. Jackson in FORTRAN, running on a mainframe computer. We have ported the game to a PC running under MS Windows XP. Players are in the position of a top manager in an industrial enterprise. They have to take eight decisions of strategic relevance for each quarter


Decisions are:

  • Product PRICE
  • MARKETING budget
  • R&D budget
  • Plant MAINTENANCE budget
  • PRODUCTION VOLUME
  • PLANT INVESTMENT
  • MATERIALS PURCHASE
  • DIVIDENDS

Up to nine firms compete in a market for similar products. 

Decisions are made for a simulated period of one quarter year. They can be adjusted for the following period after the outcome of the simulation has been reviewed.

Although the number of eight decisions looks rather small, there is a rich set of plausible consequences to be considered: 

As a learning tool, THE EXECUTIVE GAME provides much of the excitement and many of the problems encountered by top management. It allows participants the unique opportunity to experience both the cooperative and competitive interactions of business, while learning about teamwork in a decision-making environment. The game emphasizes quantitative skills, however, not to the exclusion of qualitative considerations. At the beginning of play, the participants must depend on intuitive judgements grounded in previous experience and common sense. Throughout the game, players will need to second-guess competitors, camouflage their own strategy, respond decisively to successful actions of other firms, and take advantage of the competition's errors. Also, the game is an excellent exercise in teamwork. In the business environment, corporate activities among managers who are more or less peers in the organizational hierarchy are at least as important as actions coordinated by central authority. The game illustrates how a team becomes more capable than any one person. 

*) Reference: Richard C. Henshaw, James R. Jackson: The Executive Game, R. D. Irwin 1972

Impressum / (C)opyright: Author (Text and Program Code):
Gilbert Kalb, Siegstr. 3, 56235 Ransbach-Baumbach, Germany

Some examples of played games: